A little help goes a long way, especially when discussing the merits of being a wheelbarrow

This weekend, I had a helper who was visiting the farm. His dad was building a new structure for the pig, Willow, who’s going to be coming next week. YAY!!! (Brief side note: a few weeks ago I was told about this incoming girl and the young volunteer said that her name was Mia but we would have to become used to the name Willow. I’d be lying if I said that Willow isn’t my favorite movie of all time. So, for me, that won’t be a problem. When I asked him if he’d heard of the movie, he said no. Sigh.) Back to this last visit, the boy was bored  and ended up in my coral so I let him help out a bit, doing things like sweeping Athena’s area of the barn. I said that I had to scoop the poop and he asked if he could help. “Why, yes! Yes, you can!” He’s 10 and this is what he had to say about the life of a wheelbarrow. “I feel bad for wheelbarrows.” “How come?” “Well, it’s just that – I know they aren’t alive – they get stuck with carrying around all this heavy poop.” I absolutely loved his interjection and that comment made my day.

You know what else made my day? My friends.

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Here’s Athena ignoring me…

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But then she showed me her beautiful face. I told my little buddy all of their stories and he was fascinated that Athena was able to survive on the median of a highway for two years. “What did she eat?” “Whatever she could find, I guess.” He was very impressed when she walked up to me in search of treats.

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I told him all about how Lunar and Spirit (who didn’t want his photo taken this week) are food aggressive and that the noises that Spirit made while eating were to let Lunar know that it’s his food and she’d better stay away. Fortunately for everyone, they were both in their pens.

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A rare shot of the three of them like this. Usually, Lunar’s already eating when Gully and Athena are let into the coral, but everyone was already together when I arrived. I’ve become much more confident about getting the horses into their pens but usually it’s just the two horses to contend with. Tensions are a bit higher when the littler folk is around and could be trampled, but Spirit behaved very nicely for me and Lunar was fine with entering the pen without her food.

These roosters have taken to huddling up together on the fence at the end of the night once it calms down. During this visit, they decided that they were going to sit right in front of the stairs I use to get out. So, I decided that a good deal of petting was in order. They decided that it wasn’t worth moving further down the fence so they just squawked a bunch in protest. I ended up exiting a different way. They are super soft!

Roosters

Whenever I leave now, I visit the cat house on the way out. I’ve been doing this for the past several months to visit Howie, who was Levi’s original friend when he came to the farm. He’s an old man, so I always stop in to give him a few treats and some pats on the head. I found Apricot in the house, as well, basking in the glow of the wood stove.

Apricot

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9 Comments

Filed under athena, goats, gulliver, lunar, roosters, spirit, winslow farm

9 responses to “A little help goes a long way, especially when discussing the merits of being a wheelbarrow

  1. Nice pics! It looks like a happy place.

  2. You can’t beat the honesty of children! Love them

  3. I am new here, so questions must be asked. Working farm? Animals used for milk and wool? Or more family oriented so mostly as pets?

    • Hi Jon! Thanks for stopping by! Winslow Farm Animal Sanctuary (www.winslowfarm.com) is a non-working/non-profit farm in Norton MA where abused and neglected animals live out happy lives. There are about 350 animals on the farm. I volunteer there every week and share stories about the animals hoping to give Winslow a bit of exposure and also because I just love them all so much. Feel free to ask as many questions as you’d like! ~Devon~

  4. What adorable friends you have. :)

  5. Patty Lucas

    Devon I didn’t know Athena was left on a highway. Isn’t it wonderful she has a friend like you!

    • Yep, she was living on the median strip of a highway for two years. They weren’t able to rescue her in fear that she’d run into on-coming traffic. She was rescued by the MSPCA, who also rescued Gully and they came to live on the farm together.
      I’m pretty lucky that she’s MY friend, too. :)

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